Workplace Safety North moves downtown

Workplace Safety North is the newest addition to Sudbury’s vibrant downtown neighbourhood.

“In addition to being the home of Ontario Mine Rescue headquarters, the new location at 235 Cedar St. offers a state-of-the-art learning environment with additional classroom training facilities for ministry-approved health and safety training, including mining supervisor common core, working at heights, and mine rescue,” Candys Ballanger-Michaud, WSN’s president and CEO, said in a release. “We plan to move in by the end of May.”

Ted Hanley, general manager of Ontario Mine Rescue, said the move was a good thing for his group, as well.

“The Ontario Mine Rescue program has been in the hearts and minds of Sudbury miners for generations,” Hanley said. “We’re proud to see the improved Sudbury District Mine Rescue Station relocate to a great facility in the heart of Greater Sudbury. We look forward to working with all the Ontario Mine Rescue volunteers from the Sudbury and Onaping districts as together we develop new and innovative ways to prepare for the mine emergencies we hope will never occur.”

As one of four sector-based health and safety associations in Ontario, it provides occupational health and safety training and services for mining and forest products industries, as well as businesses across northern Ontario.

“Last year, staff provided almost 2,000 occupational health and safety training sessions across the province, so this move comes at a good time as the new building offers additional classroom space,” Ballanger-Michaud continued. “The building also serves as a centre of innovation for workplace health and safety in northern Ontario, a place for researchers and partners to meet, collaborate and share knowledge.”

WSN is also an auditor for the provincial Safe Workplace Ontario business health and safety certification program, which serves 320 firms, and facilitates the Northern Ontario Safety Group, which has regional meetings across the province for approximately 94 northern companies. Member firms also access specialized health and safety systems and cultural auditing services.

Also underway until April 20 in Sudbury, the annual WSN mining health and safety conference plays host to more than 250 delegates from across the province and offers free live-streaming of conference sessions to a global audience.

Health and Safety Specialists are located across the province, and WSN also serves member firms from offices in North Bay and Sudbury. An independent not-for-profit organization, WSN and its legacy organizations have been helping to make Ontario workplaces safer for more than 100 years. For more information, visit workplacesafetynorth.ca.

sud.editorial@sunmedia.ca

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